Advance Praise and Press for Two Roads From Here

A must-have coming-of-age story that will resonate with all types of YA readers.
— School Library Journal
The book is compulsively readable and unfailingly well written, and the characters are nicely individualized. Impressively original.
— Booklist
Readers will be completely drawn in by the unique text structure of this story.
— School Library Journal
Deeply drawn characters and skillful use of multiple first-person narratives take readers down two possible paths
— Kirkus Reviews
Those who enjoyed Susan Beth Pfeffer’s Life as We Knew It or Emery Lord’s When We Collided will be captivated by this title’s alternating character views and dramatic plotlines.
— School Library Journal
‘Destiny or decision?’ The answer may be unknowable, but Steinkellner gives readers something to think about.
— Kirkus Reviews
Readers will be able to easily relate to the struggles of these high school seniors as they make life-defining choices.
— VOYA
Is one choice more ‘right’ than another? Will the teens end up in the same place regardless of what they choose? The philosophical answers will pique readers’ interest.
— Publishers Weekly
Two Roads From Here is full of unexpected plot twists, moments of crisis, and overlapping storylines... the author delivers an impactful plot encouraging readers to think seriously about how their choices affect themselves and others.
— VOYA

Praise and Press for Trash Can Nights

Through the use of humor, the author creates an authentic world of characters and events that reflect middle school angst complicated by gangs, bullying, mean girls, social media, relationships, and drama... This novel, as well as its companion, would be a wise addition to teachers’ and librarians’ shelves.
— VOYA Magazine

Here I am being interviewed about Trash Can Nights by publishing legend Fred Klein on his television show, Literary Gumbo!

This is a realistic portrayal of a middle-school experience—a time of big changes and the beginnings of self-awareness. Reading the first book is not necessary, although it will add to the enjoyment of the sequel, which is sure to be popular.
— School Library Journal
Steinkellner is capable of writing nearly flawless sentences
— Kirkus Reviews

Praise and Press for Trash Can Days

Trash Can Days has a nuanced, entertaining take on the socially powerful — one that doesn’t fit into the tidy parameters of an ‘Afterschool Special’-style lesson.
— The New York Times Book Review
In a story that’s funny, crass, painful, and optimistic, Steinkellner skillfully juggles a large cast, giving even minor characters distinctive voices and making their disappointments and growth feel real.
— Publishers Weekly
Debut novelist Steinkellner uses IM conversations, Facebook posts, school bulletins, emails, and text message exchanges to flesh out the kids’ complicated lives, pulling in everything from gang pressures and ethnic tensions to hurtful gossip and even the administrative pushback their new English teacher is facing.
— Publishers Weekly
...Everything a middle school novel should be: funny, dramatic, and quite moving.
— Kirkus Reviews
[A] powerful one-two punch of precisely calibrated diction and sturdy, suspenseful adult-grade plotting.
— The Santa Barbara Independent
It would be a pity if the provincial self-appointed censors who get off on “protecting” young teenagers from the truth suppress this wonderful story, as it has much to teach about the way gangs have infiltrated our culture down through the middle-school years, and about what the ups and downs of early romantic experiences can teach those willing to learn from them.
— The Santa Barbara Independent
Steinkellner has a sharp grasp of the insult-laden dialogue middle schoolers use with obnoxious abandon. Just as he doesn’t sugarcoat the way his characters express themselves, the relationship between Danny and Jake doesn’t resolve itself neatly or painlessly. But becoming a teenager is just like that — sometimes sad and often messy.
— The New York Times Book Review
Teddy has created a cast of totally unforgettable characters who show us that no one sees the same situation the same way. Trash can days is awesome.
— Brent Crawford, author of the Carter Series

A Children's Book Council "Hot Off the Press" Book for August 2013!

Here is a full-length feature article on me in the Peninsula Press!

A debut YA novel by whiz kid Teddy Steinkellner, Trash Can Days is an authentic slice of life... This is a funny novel, but manages to be true and surprising and gut-wrenching as well... Kid obsessions and adult concerns merge—just like in middle school!—and it’s a book that (don’t tell the kids) makes you think.
— Hometown-Pasadena.com
The author has a wonderful ear for the language of teenagers and the milieu in which they live. The passages in which the teenagers text each other reveal their true feelings about a variety of subjects.
— Jewish Book Council